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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,371 (some duplicates have been removed)
to al qaeda. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we explore the legal and other issues surrounding the u.s. policy. >> ifill: then, federal and state governments sue a credit ratings agency it says gave good ratings to bad mortgage investments. >> brown: ray suarez looks at president obama's use of campaign-style events to push his legislative agenda. >> ifill: hari sreenivsan examines a million-dollar match fixing scandal shaking the world of international soccer. >> brown: and playing with the enemy: we have the story of an orchestra of israelis and arabs coming together for music, and maybe more. >> the only way that we can achieve anything that is remotely related to peace is if we sit together and talk or if we at least try to. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> sailing through the heart of historic landscapes you see things differently. you get close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only the river can give y
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama took his push for tighter gun control laws on the road today to a police department in minnesota. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get reaction to the president's proposal to ban assault weapons and institute universal background checks from two local law enforcement officials. >> brown: then, we have the story of a navy seal, a sniper in the iraq war and best-selling author who was gunned down by a fellow veteran at a shooting range in texas. >> ifill: margaret warner looks at how ancient manuscripts in mali were saved, hidden from destruction during the conflict with islamist rebels. >> brown: what makes a great teacher? hari sreenivasan reports on a charter school in connecticut that uses a checklist to evaluate and keep the best of them in the classroom. >> we have parents, students peer and principal surveys, so the teachers are really getting a whole 360 take on what they are doing well and what they need to improve. >> ifill: the 500-
law school, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> brown: you can read the justice department's memo for yourself. you'll find a link to that on our web site. still to come on the newshour, did s&p knowingly inflate its credit ratings; the never-ending campaign; global soccer under investigation; and an orchestra's mission of music and more. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: this year's federal budget deficit will fall below a trillion dollars for the first time since president obama took office. the congressional budget office projected today the red ink will be roughly $845 billion. it was $1.1 trillion last year. the c.b.o. attributed the decline in part to new tax hikes and to automatic spending cuts scheduled to take effect in march. but it said those same factors may also hold back economic growth. personal computer maker dell has announced it's going private. the company detailed a $24 billion buyout of stockholders today. it's the largest deal of its kind since the great recession. dell has been publicly traded for nearly 25 years.
of any deep ideas about it. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: president obama made his first second-term foray outside washington today, with a call to stop gun violence. it was part of a campaign-style effort designed to goad congress into action. >> we don't have to agree on everything to agree it's time to do something. >> ifill: the president took that message to minneapolis, a city that's already imposed stricter background checks on gun buyers. the white house plan calls for those checks, a renewed ban on assault-style weapons and limits on hig
's basically a bus of between the new deal in the 1930s in brown v. board of education in 1954. the idea is to think what civil rights looked like before brown. ron tells us one vision of civil rights comment that jim crow was a state mandated segregation in brown versus the board of education that's not constitutional and we know from there into a new era of civil rights. what civil rights look like before brown, before we had that idea of jim crow? index of a black workers rights killers to do for them, what they thought jim crow did to them and how it harms none and in their idea was a lot prouder than brown versus board of education. it's not only was saying that black children are my children go to different schools. it's not only anti-miscegenation laws. it's also employers who only higher weight or hire african-americans only for the worst paid and most dangerous and worse condition jobs. if the federal government and the state government interfering in the economy and racially discriminatory ways. the image that comes out other cases that takes on african-american workers reveal
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: "neither rain nor sleet nor snow." but the cash-strapped u.s. postal service will eliminate mail delivery on saturdays. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, we talk with postmaster general patrick donahoe. >> brown: then, president obama picks r.e.i. executive sally jewell to run the interior department. we look at how the cabinet is shaping up with many posts yet to fill. >> ifill: we have two stories from the middle east. margaret warner gets the latest from tunisia, the birthplace of the arab spring, where a leading opposition figure was assassinated today. >> brown: and ray suarez reports on the plight of syrian refugees who've fled to lebanon. >> at this tent camp in al-marj, in the eastern part of lebanon's bekaa valley-- only 25 miles from the syrian border-- refugees are struggling to adapt to a new, impermanent reality. >> ifill: and we close with a look at what's happening with the boy scouts, as they struggle to decide whether to lift a long-standing ban
for joining us. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: the supreme court heard a challenge today to the landmark voting rights act from alabama officials who said a key provision has outlived its usefulness. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill on the "newshour" tonight. marcia coyle fills us in on the court arguments followed by a debate on whether the whole the law is still needed. >> brown: then, ray suarez reports on the political push to tighten gun control laws, including a ban on assault weapons. >> ifill: does it matter where we work? yahoo c.e.o. marissa mayer sparks an uproar by banning employees from working from home. >> brown: from our "coping with climate change" series, hari sreenivasan takes to the slopes and asks: could rising temperatures endanger future ski seasons? >> you don't kn if u're going to have good snow. you don't know if it's going to come early or late, or if the spring is going to become warm, and the season is going to end prematurely. we just don't have that dependability anymore. >> ifill: we have an en
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: north korea conducted its third high-level nuclear test, an action condemned by the united nations security council, president obama, and other world leaders. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, is pyongyang taking steps to build a bomb that could reach the united states? we examine the challenges the test poses for the west. >> brown: hari sreenivason gets the latest on the former los angeles police officer wanted for murder, after a gun battle in the big bear mountains this afternoon. >> woodruff: then, we get a preview of tonight's state of the union address from white house press secretary jay carney. >> brown: from malaysia, special correspondent steve sapienza reports on the social and environmental costs of harvesting palm oil, found in products ranging from cookies to cosmetics. >> one big reason the oil is so cheap to produce is the steady supply of migrant labor. it relies on 500,000 global workers to feed demand for the product and fuel malaysia's econo
to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. postal service announced today it plans to end saturday mail delivery beginning in august. under the plan, post offices already open on saturdays will remain so. packages will also continue to be delivered on saturdays. but home and business mail would end. the move would save an estimated $2 billion annually. the postal service ended the last budget year with a record loss, nearly $16 billion. today's decision was criticized by several members of congress who may try to overule the agency. and the head of the letter carrier's union called the move "a disastrous idea that would have a profoundly negative effect." joining us now is postmaster general patrick donohoe. and welcome to you. you spoke today being in a "very scary position financially." how scary? >> well, here's where we are right flow. now. as you mentioned we had a pretty substantial loss last year and those were accounting losses. $11.1 billion of the $15.9 is attributed to prepayment for retiree health care that we didn't pay. we defaulted. you have
scott brown has declared tonight that he's not running for the senate again up in massachusetts. i assume this means he will run for governor. i think it's a smart move for him. being a legislator is not for everyone. you have to have the patience and the personal instinct to move the bill forward. as again, i'll say it's not for everyone. he might be smart to wait his chance as he seems to be doing a run for an executive job, one that he can grab, hold onto and really do something with. we'll see. as for the senate seat in massachusetts, i have a firm grip on who i'd like to see take it. congressman edward markey is the most principle person i know in politics. the pollute ters, the people who make bad products. he has sat on legislative committees and seen the power of special interest and he again and again has taken them on. markey is a committed believer in the dangers of nuclear war. he has always, from his first days in the house back in the 1970s, refused to buckle to the forces of selfishness and power. ed markey is running for the senate seat. he enjoys the support of mrs
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: john brennan, president obama's choice to head the c.i.a. faced a volley of questions from senators today about counter-terrorism policies, including waterboarding and drone strikes. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we excerpt today's testony, which was interrupted from the start by protesters from the anti-war group, code pink. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the massive manhunt for a former los angeles police office wanted for murder. >> suarez: we turn to iran as the u.s. tightens sanctions but tehran shows no signs of halting its nuclear program or engaging in talks. >> brown: from our american graduate series, we have the story of a chicago non-profit that aims to change the lives of would-be dropouts. >> what's interesting about one goal is that it pinpoints and targets low-income, underperforming students in non- selective chicago public schools, students who are least likely to graduate from high school, let alone college. >> suarez: we look at newly re
for chris brown. also, more trouble for chrislook, every day we're using more and more energy. the world needs more energy. where's it going to come from? ♪ that's why right here, in australia, chevron is building one of the biggest natural gas projects in the world. enough power for a city the size of singapore for 50 years. what's iit going to do to the planet? natural gas is the cleanest conventional fuel there is. we've got to be smart about this. it's a smart way to go. ♪ i work for 47 different companies. well, technically i work for one. that company, the united states postal service®, works for thousands of home businesses. because at usps.com®, you can pay, print and have your packages picked up for free. i can even drop off free boxes. i wear a lot of hats. well, technically i wear one. the u.s. postal service®, no business too small. you are watching abc 7 news 11:00, on your side. president obama will be giving the state of the union budget cutsuesday. could have a particular impact the community. calling on congress to come up with a short term solution to the problem
and sundays 10:00 a.m. here on 34rks snbc. >> coming up, what a day in politics. scott brown is not running and now geraldo rivera may be geraldo? >>> plus, george bush's brain is much, much bigger than the meltdown on fox news. america is changing. the president knows it, but republicans don't. >>> and my thoughts of ed koch passing, my friend and political opponent for decades. you're watching "politics nation" on msnbc. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can
>> brown: we get closing thoughts about the president's speech tonight from mark shields and david brooks. that's all ahead on tonight's >> brown: and we get some closing thoughts about the president's speech tonight from mark shields and david brooks. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: another defiant act by north korea today. the nation carried out its third nuclear test, triggering new fears and a global outcry. the announcement blared forth on north korean state television. >> main purpose of this nuclear test is to show the resentment of our people and army of
an awesome cave. (bats squeaking) shh, chris. listen. squeaking. ah, little brown bats. chris: oh, this bat's starting to wake up. you can tell because he's doing the wake-up shiver where he gets his muscles going, warms up his body and then he'll fly. little brown bats are so tiny. they're less than half the size of a mouse. where are you going, buddy? getting ready to fly? there he goes. chris: oh, imagine if we could hang out with these little brown bats wherever they go and do whatever they do. imagine if we could fly like bats and had all their awesome bat powers. what if? what if? ♪ on adventure with the coolest creatures ♪ ♪ from the oceans to the trees ♪ ♪ the brothers kratt are going places you never get to see ♪ ♪ hanging with their creature friends ♪ ♪ get ready, it's the hour ♪ ♪ we're gonna save some animals today with ♪ ♪ creature power ♪ ♪ gonna go wild, wild kratts ♪ ♪ gonna go wild, wild wild kratts ♪ ♪ gonna go wild, wild kratts ♪ ♪ gonna go wild, wild, wild ♪ ♪ cheetah speed and
following more than two months of cancer treatment in cuba. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks with filmmaker kirby dick about his oscar-nominated documentary "the invisible war," detailing the high rate of sexual assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape itself. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring nation
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the nine justices of the u.s. supreme court pondered a central piece of civil rights legislation today. at issue: whether it's still needed, 48 years after it first became law. >> we are not there yet! >> brown: georgia congressman and civil rights leader john lewis was one of many who rallied outside the court this morning for the voting rights act. they were there on a day the justices heard a challenge to a key section of the law: it requires states with a history of discrimination-- mainly in the deep south-- to get federal approval, or pre- clearance, before changing voting procedures or districts. lewis argued the provision-- known as "section five"-- must be preserved. >> there are still forces in this country that want to take us back to another period, but we're not going back. we've come too far. we've made too much progress to go back. the literacy test may be gone; but people are using other means, other tactics and techniques. so we still need section 5 and that's why we are here today standing up
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: the president's pick to be the next secretary of defense, former senator chuck hagel, defended his record today and said america must engage-- not retreat-- in the world. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we excerpt tay's confirmation hearing,s republicans sparred th the forer vietnam comb veteran about the war in iraq and more. >> brown: then, we have two stories from the middle east, beginning with a dramatic late- night rescue of syrian refugees, fleeing across the border to jordan. >> woodruff: and a margaret warner report about the threat a nuclear-armed iran poses to israel. >> if they accumulate enough uranium which is close to weapons grade, enough uranium which enables them to detonate one nuclear device: to me is clearly a redline. >> brown: former vice presint al gore joins us to talk about his new book as well as money, politics and the future of democracy. >> the congress is virtually incapable of passing any reforms unless they first get permiss
mone >> brown: then, we turn to the troubled nomination of chuck hagel, president obama's choice to be secretary of defense, as republicans temporarily block a vote in the senate. >> woodruff: we talk to four new members of the house of representatives about the president's state of the union address, the stalemate in washington and more. >> brown: ray suarez gets an update on the south african olympic athlete known as blade runner charged today with murdering his girlfriend. >> woodruff: and we close on this valentine's day with love letters from president lyndon johnson to bride to be-- lady bird. >reading them tught, ese are beautiful, these are wonderful. that's exactly sort of thing that we all would like to receive. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoin
to work very hard to defeat them all >> reporter: dudley brown heads the group rocky mountain gun owners >> i think the question for the democrat caucus is are you really ready to stake the 2014 elections on the gun issue. because the democrat party has done that before. and paid the price. with the 94 congress and they're going to pay the price again >> reporter: brown says his numbers are calling and mailing lawmakers. even republicans are feeling the heat >> nationally it's a big issue. here in colorado we have the aurora shooting which certainly brought up the attention for everyone >> reporter: republicans like state senator kevinlundberg have their own proposals. they've introduced bills to pressure businesses into allowing concealed weapons on their property and to let some teachers carry guns. >> if somebody comes in armed intending on harm and starts to pull the trigger, somebody needs to be able to stop them now. commendable at the aurora shooting that the police were there in a matter of a minute or two. but where we need to fix it, it's before the trigger is pulled. it's the
." tonight jeffrey brown reports on the possible links, if any, between violent video games and violent behavior. >> the result clearly shows that playing a violent video game increases aggressive behavior. >> one of the problems in this field is that people confuse aggression and violence. >> woodruff: and margaret warner gets an update on the oscar pistorius murder trial in south africa, as the prosecution and the defense lay out conflicting accounts of the events leading to his girlfriend's death. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a u.s. security firm charged today there's
. wait till he sees that. >> coming up -- chris brown is getting heckled by some guy on the street and this guy is laying into him. >> he's like all over this car. >> nobody ever touchars does not sleep with black talent. >> suppose there is a white woman who decides her thinghing only to sleep with black guys. >> i love her whoever she is. >> coming up, rick and kathy hilton. >> what is the crappiest hilton? >> he goes the oxnard >> got too much time on your hands, instead of filling it with family and friends why not connect with in, you can sign up for facebook and twitter. tired of watching videos of disgruntled cats? sign up for the official youtube page. you'll get bonus content you won't see on the or website. >> and we're not just talking about harvey's tweets. though there will be plenty of those. check out "tmz" on twitter, facebook and youtube. it's like having millions of friend you'll never meet in person right manti. >> what up, chris? >> that's chris brown in hollywood last night. finally an evening with chris brown without any drama or violence is what we would say
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,371 (some duplicates have been removed)

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